「社会人のための英語回路構築トレーニング自習帖」著者のブログ

Thank You for Visiting Me! 「英語赤ひげ先生」による「知っている英語」を「使える英語」にするための「理論」と「教材」を一挙に無料公開しています。

Kazuo Ishiguro: When We Were Orphans (176)

‘You must have me mixed up with someone else, old fellow. I was always one for mucking in. I dare say you’re thinking of that fellow Bigglesworth. Adrian Bigglesworth. He was certainly a bit of a loner.’
‘Bigglesworth?’ Morgan thought about this, then shook his head. ‘I remember the chap. Rather heavy-set, jug ears? Old Bigglesworth. My, my. But no, I wasn’t thinking of him.’
‘Well, it wasn’t me, old man.’
‘Extraordinary.’ He shook his head again, then turned back to his window.
I too turned away, and for the next little while gazed out at the night-time streets. We were once again moving through a busy entertainment area, and I glanced through the faces in the crowds, hoping to glimpse Akira’s. Then we were in a residential district full of hedges and trees, and before long the driver brought the car to a halt inside the grounds of a large house.
Morgan left the vehicle hurriedly. I too got out – the chauffeur made no effort to assist – and followed him along a graveled path leading around the side of the house. I suppose I had been expecting a big reception of some sort, but I could now see this was not what awaited us; the house was for the most part dark, and aside from our own car, there was only one other in the courtyard.
Morgan, who was clearly familiar with the house, brought us to a side door flanked by tall shrubs. He opened it without ringing and ushered me inside.
We found ourselves in a spacious hallway lit by candles. Peering before me, I could make out musty-looking scrolls, huge porcelain vases, a lacquered chest of drawers. The smell in the air – of course mingled with that of excrement – was oddly comforting.
No servant or host appeared. My companion continued to stand beside me, not saying a word. After a time, it occurred to me he was waiting for me to make some comment on our surroundings. So I said:
‘I know little about Chinese artwork. But even to my eye, it’s clear we’re surrounded by some rather fine things.’


註釈:

‘You must have me mixed up with someone else, old fellow.
この「have」を所謂「使役動詞」として捉えると混乱してしまうかもしれません。文字通りの意味は「あなたは私を持っている、mixed up with someone elseの状態で」になり「あなた私を誰か他の人だと思っている」の意。

I was always one for mucking in.
「muck in」は「仲間になる」。

I dare say you’re thinking of that fellow Bigglesworth. Adrian Bigglesworth. He was certainly a bit of a loner.’
‘Bigglesworth?’ Morgan thought about this, then shook his head.

‘I remember the chap. Rather heavy-set, jug ears? Old Bigglesworth. My, my. But no, I wasn’t thinking of him.’
「chap」は「(親しみをこめて)やつ」。「heavy-set」は「ずんぐりした」。「jug ears」は「大きな耳」。

‘Well, it wasn’t me, old man.’

‘Extraordinary.’ He shook his head again, then turned back to his window.
「extraordinary」はここでは「妙な」。

I too turned away, and for the next little while gazed out at the night-time streets.
「turn away」はここでは「顔をそむける」。「gaze」は「じっとみつめる」。

We were once again moving through a busy entertainment area, and I glanced through the faces in the crowds, hoping to glimpse Akira’s.
「entertainment area」は「歓楽街」。「glimpse」は「をちらりと見る」。

Then we were in a residential district full of hedges and trees, and before long the driver brought the car to a halt inside the grounds of a large house.
「residential district」は「住宅街」。「hedge」は「生垣」。「before long」は「まもなく」。「halt」は「停止」。「grounds」はここでは「敷地」。

Morgan left the vehicle hurriedly.

I too got out – the chauffeur made no effort to assist – and followed him along a graveled path leading around the side of the house.
「graveled」は「砂利を敷いた」。

I suppose I had been expecting a big reception of some sort, but I could now see this was not what awaited us; the house was for the most part dark, and aside from our own car, there was only one other in the courtyard.

Morgan, who was clearly familiar with the house, brought us to a side door flanked by tall shrubs. He opened it without ringing and ushered me inside.
「flank by …」は「の側面に・・・を配置する」。「shrub」は「灌木」。「usher」は「を案内する」。

We found ourselves in a spacious hallway lit by candles.

Peering before me, I could make out musty-looking scrolls, huge porcelain vases, a lacquered chest of drawers.
「make out」は「を識別する」。「musty-looking」は「古臭く見える」。「scroll」は「巻物」。「porcelain」は「磁器」。

The smell in the air – of course mingled with that of excrement – was oddly comforting.
「mingled with …」は「・・・と混じった」。「excrement」は「排泄物」。

No servant or host appeared. My companion continued to stand beside me, not saying a word.
「companion」は「連れ」。

After a time, it occurred to me he was waiting for me to make some comment on our surroundings. So I said:
「it occurred to me (that) …」で「・・・だということを思いついた」。「surroundings」は「周囲の状況」。

‘I know little about Chinese artwork. But even to my eye, it’s clear we’re surrounded by some rather fine things.’


『今日のイデイオム』

「muck in」
「仲間になる」

「turn away」
「顔をそむける」

「make out」
「を識別する」

「it occurred to me (that) …」
「・・・だということを思いついた」

ピンチヒッター(pinch hitter)

引っかけ質問で「ピンチヒッターは和製英語か正しい英語か」と質問したら、大抵の人は「和製英語だ」と答えると思いますが、「ピンチヒッター」はれっきとした「正しい英語」です。

「ピンチランナー(代走)」は「pinch runner」、「代打ホームラン」は「pinch/pinch-hit homer」です。

現代野球では「ピンチヒッター」ではなく「チャンスヒッター」のイメージですのでイメージが逆です。

何故なのかについて著者は確かな情報は持っていませんが「昔は病気・怪我以外では代打・代走は使えなかった。正しく味方のピンチの時にのみ許された」という説をネットで見つけました。ご参考まで。

「pinch-hit for …」で「・・・の代役を務める」の意になります。

Kazuo Ishiguro: When We Were Orphans (175)

‘Refugees from north of the canal,’ Morgan said blandly, and turned away. For all his being a refugee himself, he appeared to feel no special empathy with his poorer counterparts. Even when once I thought we had run over a sleeping form, and glanced back in alarm, my companion merely murmured: ‘don’t worry. Probably just some old bundle.’
Then after several minutes of silence, he startled me with a laugh. ‘Schooldays,’ he said. ‘All comes back to you. They weren’t so bad, I suppose.’
I glanced at him and noticed teas welling in his eyes. Then he said:
‘You know, we should have teamed up. The two miserable loners. That was the thing to do. You and me, we should have teamed up together. Don’t know why we didn’t. We wouldn’t have felt so left out of things if we’d done that.’
I turned to him in astonishment. But his face, caught in the changing light, told me he was somewhere far away.
As I have said, I could remember well enough Anthony Morgan’s being something of a ‘miserable loner’ at school. It was not that he was practically bullied or teased by the rest of us; rather, as I recall it, it was Morgan himself who from an early stage cast himself in that role. He it was who always chose to walk by himself, lagging several yards behind the main group; who on bright summer days refused to join in the fun, and was to be found instead alone in a room, filling a notebook with doodles. All this I can remember clearly enough. In fact, as soon as I had spotted him that night in the gloomy hotel lounge, what had come instantly to my mind was an image of his sulky, solitary walk behind the rest of us as we crossed the quadrangle between the art room and the cloisters. But his assertion that I had likewise been a ‘miserable loner’, one with whom he might have made a marching pair, was such an astounding one, it took me a while to realsie it was simply a piece of self-delusion on Morgan’s part – in all likelihood something he had invented years ago to make more palatable memories of an unhappy period. As I say, this did not occur to me instantly, and thinking about it now I see I may have been a little insensitive in my response. For I remember saying something like:


註釈:

‘Refugees from north of the canal,’ Morgan said blandly, and turned away.
「refugee」は「避難民」。「canal」は「運河」。「blandly」は「静かに、穏やかに」。「turn away」はここでは「顔をそむける」。

For all his being a refugee himself, he appeared to feel no special empathy with his poorer counterparts.
「for all …」は「・・・にもかかわらず」。「counterpart」はここでは「互いによく似た人」。

Even when once I thought we had run over a sleeping form, and glanced back in alarm, my companion merely murmured: ‘Don’t worry. Probably just some old bundle.’
「run over」は「を轢く」。「form」はここでは「人影」。「in alarm」は「驚いて」。「murmur」はここでは伝達動詞で「・・・とつぶやく」。「some+名詞単数形」は「何かの」の意。「bundle」「束」。

Then after several minutes of silence, he startled me with a laugh.
「startle」は「をびっくりさせる」。

‘Schooldays,’ he said. ‘All comes back to you. They weren’t so bad, I suppose.’

I glanced at him and noticed teas welling in his eyes.
「well」はここでは「わき出る」。

Then he said:
‘You know, we should have teamed up.
「team up」は「協力する」。

The two miserable loners. That was the thing to do. You and me, we should have teamed up together. Don’t know why we didn’t.

We wouldn’t have felt so left out of things if we’d done that.’
「leave out」は「を閉めだす」。

I turned to him in astonishment.
「astonishment」は「驚き」。

But his face, caught in the changing light, told me he was somewhere far away.
As I have said, I could remember well enough Anthony Morgan’s being something of a ‘miserable loner’ at school.

It was not that he was practically bullied or teased by the rest of us; rather, as I recall it, it was Morgan himself who from an early stage cast himself in that role.
「It was not that …」は「・・・ということではなかった」。「bully」は「をいじめる」。「tease」は「をからかう」。「recall」は「を思い出す」。

He it was who always chose to walk by himself, lagging several yards behind the main group; who on bright summer days refused to join in the fun, and was to be found instead alone in a room, filling a notebook with doodles.
「lag」は「のろのろ歩く」。「doodle」は「いたずら書き」。

All this I can remember clearly enough.

In fact, as soon as I had spotted him that night in the gloomy hotel lounge, what had come instantly to my mind was an image of his sulky, solitary walk behind the rest of us as we crossed the quadrangle between the art room and the cloisters.
「in fact」はここでは「実際」。「sulky」は「すねた」。「solitary」は「ひとりだけの」。「quadrangle」はここでは「中庭」。「cloisters」は「回廊」。

But his assertion that I had likewise been a ‘miserable loner’, one with whom he might have made a matching pair, was such an astounding one, it took me a while to realsie it was simply a piece of self-delusion on Morgan’s part – in all likelihood something he had invented years ago to make more palatable memories of an unhappy period.
「assertion」は「主張」。「astounding」は「びっくり仰天させるような」。「self-delusion」は「迷想」。「palatable」はここでは「快い」。

As I say, this did not occur to me instantly, and thinking about it now I see I may have been a little insensitive in my response.
「as I say」は「先ほども言ったように」。言った内容は現在も正しいという意識なので現在形が使われていると考えられます。「insensitive」はここでは「心ない」。

For I remember saying something like:
「for」はここでは「接続詞」で「というのは」の意。


『今日のイデイオム』

「turn away」
「顔をそむける」

「for all …」
「・・・にもかかわらず」

「run over」
「を轢く」

「some+名詞単数形」
「何かの」

「team up」
「協力する」

「leave out」
「を閉めだす」。

「It was not that …」
「・・・ということではなかった」

「in fact」
「実際」

「as I say」
「先ほども言ったように」
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