Chapter 10
V

The storm increased. The wind howled against the side of the house.
Every one was in the living room.
They sat listlessly huddled together. And, surreptitiously, they watched each other.
When Rogers brought in the tea tray, they all jumped.
He said:
“Shall I draw the curtains? It would make it more cheerful like.”
Receiving an assent to this, the curtains were drawn and the lamps turned on. The room grew more cheerful. A little of the shadow lifted. Surely, by tomorrow, the storm would be over and someone would come - a boat would arrive …
Vera Claythorne said:
“Will you pour out tea, Miss Brent?”
The elder woman replied:
“No, you do it, dear. That teapot is so heavy. And I have lost two skeins of my grey knitting wool. So annoying.”
Vera moved to the tea table. There was a cheerful rattle and clink of china. Normality returned.
Tea! Blessed ordinary everyday afternoon tea! Philip Lombard made a cheery remark. Blore responded. Dr. Armstrong told a humorous story. Mr. Justice Wargrave, who ordinary hated tea, sipped approvingly.
Into this relaxed atmosphere came Rogers.
And Rogers was upset. He said nervously and at random:
“Excuse me, sir, but does anyone know what’s become of the bathroom curtain?”
Lombard’s head went up with a jerk.
“The bathroom curtain? What the devil do you mean, Rogers?”
“It’s gone, sir, clean vanished. I was going round drawing all the curtains and the one in the lav - bathroom wasn’t there any longer.”
Mr. Justice Wargrave asked:
“Was it there this morning?”
“Oh yes, sir.”
Blore said:
“What kind of curtain was it?”
“Scarlet oilsilk, sir. It went with the scarlet tiles.”
Lombard said:
“And it’s gone?”
“Gone, sir.”
They stared at each other.
Blore said heavily:
“Well - after all - what of it? It’s mad - but so’s everything else. Anyway it doesn’t matter. You can’t kill anybody with an oilsilk curtain. Forget about it.”
Rogers said:
“Yes, sir, thank you, sir.”
He went out shutting the door behind him.
Inside the room, the pall of fear had fallen anew.
Again, surreptitiously, they watched each other.


注釈:
The storm increased.
「increase」は自動詞では「増える、増大する(grow, strengthen)」の意。「嵐は強まった」。

The wind howled against the side of the house.
「howl」はここでは「ヒューヒューうなる」。

Every one was in the living room.
They sat listlessly huddled together.
「listless」の「list」は「望み」の意ですが「listlessly」は「元気なく、ぼんやりと、大儀そうに」の意になります。「be huddled together」で「寄り集まる」の意。

And, surreptitiously, they watched each other.
「surreptitiously」は「秘密に、こっそりと(secretly)」の意。

When Rogers brought in the tea tray, they all jumped.
「jump」はここでは「jump to one’s feet」の意で「ぴょんと立ちあがる」。日本語の「ジャンプする」ではありません。

He said:
“Shall I draw the curtains?
「draw」は「ゆっくり滑らかに引く」が基本的なイメージです。

It would make it more cheerful like.”
「it」はここでは「その部屋の雰囲気」位のニュアンスでしょうか。この「like」は動詞・形容詞の後で使われて「いくぶん、ある程度」の意になります。

Receiving an assent to this, the curtains were drawn and the lamps turned on.
「assent」は「同意、賛同、承諾(agreement)」。

The room grew more cheerful.
A little of the shadow lifted.
「the shadow」は「この場で誰でも分かるハズのshadow」の意になりますので「皆を覆っている暗い影」位の意。

Surely, by tomorrow, the storm would be over and someone would come -; a boat would arrive …
「surely」はここでは「きっと(certainly)」

Vera Claythorne said:
“Will you pour out tea, Miss Brent?”
「pour out …」で「・・・をついでやる」。

The elder woman replied:
“No, you do it, dear. That teapot is so heavy.
And I have lost two skeins of my grey knitting wool.
「skein」は「(糸の)かせ(一定の大きさの枠に糸を一定量巻いて 束にしたもの)」。「have lost」と現在完了形になっていますので「未だ見つかっていない」ことが含意されます。

So annoying.”
「annoying」は「人をいらいらさせる(irritating)」。

Vera moved to the tea table. There was a cheerful rattle and clink of china.
「rattle」は「ガチャガチャいう音」。「clink」は「チリンと鳴る音」。

Normality returned.
「normality」は「正常、常態」。

Tea! Blessed ordinary everyday afternoon tea!
Philip Lombard made a cheery remark.
「cheery remark」は「上機嫌な感想」位のニュアンス。

Blore responded. Dr. Armstrong told a humorous story.
Mr. Justice Wargrave, who ordinary hated tea, sipped approvingly.
「approvingly」はここでは「満足げに」。

Into this relaxed atmosphere came Rogers.
And Rogers was upset.
「upset」はここでは「(感情的に)混乱した」。

He said nervously and at random:
「at random」は通例「無作為に」の意になりますが、元々「speedily」の意がありましたので、ここではその意味で使われていると思います。「早口で」。

“Excuse me, sir, but does anyone know what’s become of the bathroom curtain?”
「what’s become of …」で「・・・はどうなったのか」の意になります」。

Lombard’s head went up with a jerk.
「with a jerk」で「急に」。「顔を急に上げた」。

“The bathroom curtain? What the devil do you mean, Rogers?”
“It’s gone, sir, clean vanished.
「clean」はここでは副詞で「すっかり(completely)」。「vanished」は「消滅した(disappeared)」。

I was going round drawing all the curtains and the one in the lav -; bathroom wasn’t there any longer.”
「lav」は「lavatory」のことで「手洗い」。「bathroom」はここでは「浴室」ではなく「(便器と洗面台だけある)手洗い」の意。

Mr. Justice Wargrave asked:
“Was it there this morning?”
“Oh yes, sir.”
Blore said:
“What kind of curtain was it?”
“Scarlet oilsilk, sir.
「oilsilk」は「防水絹」。

It went with the scarlet tiles.”
「go with …」で「・・・とよく似合う」。

Lombard said:
“And it’s gone?”
“Gone, sir.”
They stared at each other.
Blore said heavily:
「heavily」はここでは文脈から「slowly」。

“Well - after all - what of it?
「what of it?」は「それがどうした?(so what?)」

It’s mad - but so’s everything else. Anyway it doesn’t matter. You can’t kill anybody with an oilsilk curtain. Forget about it.”
Rogers said:
“Yes, sir, thank you, sir.”
He went out shutting the door behind him.
Inside the room, the pall of fear had fallen anew.
「pall」はここでは「とばり」。「fall anew」で「(恐怖のとばりが)