Then at last I heard the men being shown out. I heard one of them say:
‘We’ll do everything we can, Mrs Banks. We must hope for the best and trust in God.’
I could not hear my mother’s reply.
As soon as the men had gone, I rushed out and asked for permission to go to Akira’s. But my mother, to my fury, completely ignored my request, saying: ‘let’s go back into the library.’
Frustrated though I was, I did as bidden, and it was there in the library that she sat me down, crouched before me and told me, very calmly, that my father had been missing since the morning. The police, alerted by his office, were carrying out a search, so far to no avail.
‘But he may well turn up by supper time,’ she said with a smile.
‘Of course he will,’ I said in a voice I hoped would convey my annoyance at this great fuss. Then I got off the chair and asked again for permission to leave. But this time I did so with less fervor, for I could see from the clock there was no longer any point in going to Akira’s. His mother would have returned; his evening meal would be served before long. I felt a huge resentment that my mother should have kept me in simply to tell me something I had more or less gleaned in the kitchen an hour and a half earlier. When at last she told me I could go, I simply went up to my room, laid my soldiers out on my rug and did my best not to think about Akira or his feelings towards me at the moment. But I kept remembering all that had been said beside the canal, and the look of gratitude he had given me. Moreover, I did not wish Akira to return to Japan any more than he did.
My sullenness stayed with me well into the night, but of course this was interpreted as my reaction to the situation regarding my father. Throughout the evening my mother would say to me things like: ‘Let’s not get gloomy. There’s sure to be a very simple explanation.’ And Mei Li was uncharacteristically gentle with me when helping with my bath. But I remember too, as the evening went on, my mother having a number of those ‘distant’ moments I was to come to know well over the weeks that followed. In fact I believe it was that same night, as I lay in my bed still preoccupied about what to say to Akira when I next saw him, that my mother murmured, looking blankly across the room:
‘Whatever happens, you can be proud of him, Puffin. You can always be proud of what he’s done.’

註釈:


Then at last I heard the men being shown out.
「show out」は「を外に案内する」。

I heard one of them say:
‘We’ll do everything we can, Mrs Banks. We must hope for the best and trust in God.’
I could not hear my mother’s reply.
As soon as the men had gone, I rushed out and asked for permission to go to Akira’s.

But my mother, to my fury, completely ignored my request, saying: ‘let’s go back into the library.’
「fury」は「激しい怒り」。

Frustrated though I was, I did as bidden, and it was there in the library that she sat me down, crouched before me and told me, very calmly, that my father had been missing since the morning.
「bid」は「に命ずる」。「crouch」は「身をかがめる」。

The police, alerted by his office, were carrying out a search, so far to no avail.
「to no avail」は「無益に、甲斐なく」。

‘But he may well turn up by supper time,’ she said with a smile.
「may well do」は「たぶん・・・だろう」。「turn up」は「現れる」。「たぶん現れるだろう」

‘Of course he will,’ I said in a voice I hoped would convey my annoyance at this great fuss.
「annoyance」は「いらだち」。「fuss」は「大騒ぎ」。

Then I got off the chair and asked again for permission to leave. But this time I did so with less fervor, for I could see from the clock there was no longer any point in going to Akira’s.
「fervor」は「熱情」。「for」はここでは接続詞で「というのは」の意。

His mother would have returned; his evening meal would be served before long. I felt a huge resentment that my mother should have kept me in simply to tell me something I had more or less gleaned in the kitchen an hour and a half earlier.
「resentment」は「憤り」。「more or less」は「大なり小なり」。「glean」は「を少しずつ収集する」。

When at last she told me I could go, I simply went up to my room, laid my soldiers out on my rug and did my best not to think about Akira or his feelings towards me at the moment. But I kept remembering all that had been said beside the canal, and the look of gratitude he had given me.

Moreover, I did not wish Akira to return to Japan any more than he did.
「not …any more than …」は「…でないのは…でないと同じ」。「私がAkira が日本に帰るのを望まなかったのはAkiraが望まなかったのと同じであった」。

My sullenness stayed with me well into the night, but of course this was interpreted as my reaction to the situation regarding my father.
「sullenness」は「不機嫌」。「interpret」はここでは「を解釈する」。

Throughout the evening my mother would say to me things like: ‘Let’s not get gloomy. There’s sure to be a very simple explanation.’
「would」はここでは「過去の習慣」を表します。

And Mei Li was uncharacteristically gentle with me when helping with my bath.
「uncharacteristically」は「珍しく」。

But I remember too, as the evening went on, my mother having a number of those ‘distant’ moments I was to come to know well over the weeks that followed.
「distant’」はここでは「放心した、ぼんやりした」。

In fact I believe it was that same night, as I lay in my bed still preoccupied about what to say to Akira when I next saw him, that my mother murmured, looking blankly across the room:
「preoccupied」は「心を奪われている」。

‘Whatever happens, you can be proud of him, Puffin. You can always be proud of what he’s done.’


『今日のイデイオム』


「show out」
「を外に案内する」

「to no avail」
「無益に、甲斐なく」

「may well do」
「たぶん・・・だろう」

「turn up」
「現れる」

「more or less」
「大なり小なり」

「not …any more than …」
「…でないのは…でないと同じ」