The young man’s face flushed with anger, and he spun away from the money as though I were proffering something quite repulsive. He sullenly got back into the car and slammed his door.
I saw I had made a miscalculation of some sort, but at that moment could not be bothered to worry about it. Besides, for all his anger, the young man had not started up the engine. I stuffed money back into my jacket, picked up the suitcase again and crossed the street.
Inside, the shop was very cramped. The afternoon sun was streaming in, but somehow only a few patches were lit by it. To one side was an upright piano with discoloured keys, and several gramophone records displayed without their sleeves along the music stand. I could see not only dust but cobwebs on the records. Elsewhere there were odd pieces of thick velvet – they appeared to be off-cuts from theatre curtains – nailed up on the walls, together with photographs of opera singers and dancers. I had perhaps expected Sarah to be standing there, but the only person present was a spindly European with a dark pointed beard sitting behind the counter.
‘Good afternoon,’ he said in a Germanic accent, glancing up from a ledgerbook spread before him. Then looking up and down carefully, he asked: ‘You are English?’
‘Yes, I am. Good afternoon.’
‘We have some records from England. For example, we have a recording of Mimi Johnson singing “I Only Have Eyes for You”. Would you appreciate?’
Something in the cautious way he had spoken suggested this was the first part of an agreed code. But though I searched my memory for some password or phrase Sarah might have told me, I could remember nothing. In the end, I said:
‘I have no phonograph with me here in Shanghai. But I’m very fond of Mimi Johnson. In fact, I attended a recital of hers in London a few years ago.’
‘Really? Mimi Johnson, yes.’
I got the distinct impression I had puzzled him with the wrong response. So I said: ‘Look here, my name is Banks. Christopher Banks.’
‘Banks. Mr Banks.’ The man said my name neutrally, then said: ‘If you appreciate Mimi Johnson, “I Only Have Eyes for You”, I shall play it for you. Please.’


註釈:

The young man’s face flushed with anger, and he spun away from the money as though I were proffering something quite repulsive.
「flush」は「赤く染まる」。「spin away from …」は「・・・からきびすを返す」。「proffer」は「を申し出る」。「repulsive」は「嫌悪感を起こさせる」。

He sullenly got back into the car and slammed his door.
「sullenly」は「むっつりと」。「his door」は「運転席側のドア」のことを言っています。

I saw I had made a miscalculation of some sort, but at that moment could not be bothered to worry about it. Besides, for all his anger, the young man had not started up the engine.

I stuffed money back into my jacket, picked up the suitcase again and crossed the street.
「stuff」はここでは「を詰め込む」

Inside, the shop was very cramped.
「cramped」はここでは「狭苦しい」。

The afternoon sun was streaming in, but somehow only a few patches were lit by it.
「patch」はここでは「区画」。

To one side was an upright piano with discoloured keys, and several gramophone records displayed without their sleeves along the music stand.
「discoloured」は「変色した」。「sleeve」はここでは「レコードのジャケット」。「music stand」は「譜面台」。

I could see not only dust but cobwebs on the records.
「cobweb」は「クモの巣」。

Elsewhere there were odd pieces of thick velvet – they appeared to be off-cuts from theatre curtains – nailed up on the walls, together with photographs of opera singers and dancers.
「off-cut」は「切れ端」。

I had perhaps expected Sarah to be standing there, but the only person present was a spindly European with a dark pointed beard sitting behind the counter.
「spindly」はここでは「きゃしゃな」。

‘Good afternoon,’ he said in a Germanic accent, glancing up from a ledgerbook spread before him.
「ledgerbook」は「記録台帳」。

Then looking up and down carefully, he asked: ‘You are English?’
‘Yes, I am. Good afternoon.’

‘We have some records from England. For example, we have a recording of Mimi Johnson singing “I Only Have Eyes for You”. Would you appreciate?’
「recording」はここでは「レコード盤」。「appreciate」はここでは「を鑑賞する」。

Something in the cautious way he had spoken suggested this was the first part of an agreed code. But though I searched my memory for some password or phrase Sarah might have told me, I could remember nothing. In the end, I said:
‘I have no phonograph with me here in Shanghai. But I’m very fond of Mimi Johnson. In fact, I attended a recital of hers in London a few years ago.’
‘Really? Mimi Johnson, yes.’
I got the distinct impression I had puzzled him with the wrong response. So I said: ‘Look here, my name is Banks. Christopher Banks.’

‘Banks. Mr Banks.’ The man said my name neutrally, then said: ‘If you appreciate Mimi Johnson, “I Only Have Eyes for You”, I shall play it for you. Please.’
ここの「shall」は「意志未来」。


『今日のイデイオム』

「spin away from …」
「・・・からきびすを返す」