原文:
Rising now, and turning his crooked back on Roach, Jim set to work on what appeared to be a detailed study of caravan’s four legs, a very critical study which involved much rocking of the suspension, and much tilting of the strangely garbed head, and the emplacement of several bricks at different angles and points. Meanwhile the spring rain was clattering down on everything: his coat, his hat and the roof of the old caravan. And Roach noticed that throughout these manoeuvres Jim’s right shoulder had not budged at all but stayed wedged high against his neck like a rock under the mackintosh. Therefore he wondered whether Jim was a sort of giant hunchback and whether all hunch backs hurt as Jim’s did. And he noticed as a generality, a thing to store away, that people with bad backs take long strides, it was something to do with balance.
‘New boy, eh?’ Well I’m not a new boy,’ Jim went on, in altogether a much more friendly tone, as he pulled at a leg of the caravan. ‘I’m an old boy. Old as Rip Van Winkle if you want to know. Older. Got any friends?’
‘No, sir,’ said Roach simply, in the listless tone which schoolboys always use for saying ‘no’, leaving all positive response to their interrogators. Jim however made no response at all, so that Roach felt odd stirring of kinship suddenly, and of hope.
‘My other name's Bill,’ he said. ‘I was cherished Bill but Mr Thursgood calls me William.’
‘Bill, eh. The unpaid Bill. Anyone ever call you that?
‘No, sir.’
‘Good name, anyway.’
‘Yes, sir.’
‘Known a lot of Bills. They’ve all been good ‘uns.’

www.DeepL.com/Translator(無料版)で翻訳しました。

今すぐに起き上がり、ローチに背を向けて、ジムはキャラバンの4本の脚の詳細な研究と思われるものに取り掛かった。サスペンションの多くの揺れ、奇妙な服装をした頭の多くの傾き、そして異なる角度とポイントでのいくつかのレンガの配置を含む非常に重要な研究である。 その間、春の雨は、彼のコート、帽子、古いキャラバンの屋根など、すべてのものに降り注いでいた。 そしてローチは、これらの操作の間、ジムの右肩が全く動かず、マッキントッシュの下の岩のように首に高くくくりつけられたままになっていることに気づいた。 そこで彼はジムがある種の巨大な猫背なのか、すべての猫背はジムのように痛むのかと疑問に思った。 そして彼は、一般的なこととして、腰の悪い人は長い距離を歩くということに気がついた。
"新入りか?ジムはキャラバンの足を引っ張りながら、ずっと親しみやすい口調で続けた。 俺は年寄りだ。 リップ・ヴァン・ウィンクルのようにな 年寄りだよ。 友達はいるか?
いません」とローチは簡単に言った。少年たちがいつも「いいえ」と言うときに使う無気力な口調で、すべての肯定的な反応は尋問者に任せた。 しかし、ジムは全く反応しなかったので、ローチは突然の親族関係と希望の妙なかき混ぜを感じた。
私の別の名前はビルだ」と彼は言った。 '私は大切にされていたビルだったが、木村さんは私をウィリアムと呼んでいる。
"ビル? 未払いのビルだ 誰かにそう呼ばれたことは?
"いいえ
"いい名前だな
'そうです
多くのビルを知っている みんないい人たちだった

解説:
Rising now, and turning his crooked(曲がった) back on Roach, Jim set to(にとりかかる) work on what appeared to be a detailed study(調査) of caravan’s four legs, a very critical study which involved much rocking of the suspension, and much tilting of the strangely garbed(服装をした) head, and the emplacement(据え付け場所) of several bricks at different angles and points. Meanwhile the spring rain was clattering(音を立てて降る) down on everything: his coat, his hat and the roof of the old caravan. And Roach noticed that throughout these manoeuvres(操作) Jim’s right shoulder had not budged(動く) at all but stayed wedged(留める) high against his neck like a rock under the mackintosh(雨コート). Therefore he wondered whether Jim was a sort of giant hunchback(脊柱後彎) and whether all hunch(こぶ) backs hurt as Jim’s did. And he noticed as a generality(一般法則), a thing to store away(心にとどめておく), that people with bad backs take long strides, it was something to do with balance.

‘New boy, eh?’ Well I’m not a new boy,’ Jim went on, in altogether(まったく) a much more friendly tone, as he pulled at(を引っ張る) a leg of the caravan.
■altogether(まったく):副詞ですが名詞を強める使い方です。

‘I’m an old boy. Old as Rip Van Winkle if you want to know. Older. Got any friends?’
■Rip Van Winkle:同名の小説の主人公の名。

‘No, sir,’ said Roach simply, in the listless(元気のない) tone which schoolboys always use for saying ‘no’, leaving all positive response to their interrogators(質問者). Jim however made no response at all, so that Roach felt odd stirring(揺れ動き) of kinship(密接な関連) suddenly, and of hope.

‘My other name’s Bill,’ he said. ‘I was cherished(育てる) Bill but Mr Thursgood calls me William.’
■I was cherished Bill:能動態は My parents cherished me Bill. SVOC文型。「Billと呼ばれて育った」。

‘Bill, eh. The unpaid Bill. Anyone ever call you that?
■The unpaid Bill:Bill という名前とbill=請求書をかけたダジャレ。
■that=the unpaid Bill

‘No, sir.’
‘Good name, anyway.’
‘Yes, sir.’
‘Known a lot of Bills. They’ve all been good ‘uns(やつ達).’