「社会人のための英語回路構築トレーニング自習帖」著者のブログ

Thank You for Visiting Me! 「英語赤ひげ先生」による「知っている英語」を「使える英語」にするための「理論」と「教材」を一挙に無料公開しています。

2017年11月

Kazuo Ishiguro: When We Were Orphans (23)

‘You may well be right, my boy,’ he said eventually. ‘I sincerely hope you are. But just in case, why don’t you come with me anyway? Then once your parents are found, they can send for you. Or who knows? Perhaps they’ll decide to come to England too. So what do you say? Let’s you and me go to England tomorrow. Then we can wait and see what happens.’
‘But you see, sir, excuse me. But you see, the detectives looking for my parents. They’re the very best detectives.’
I am not sure what exactly the colonel said to this. Perhaps he just went on nodding. In any case, the next moment, he leaned in even closer to me and placed a hand on my shoulder.
‘Look here. I realize how it must feel. Entire world’s collapsed about your ears. But you’ve got to be brave. Besides, your aunt in England. She’s expecting you, don’t you see? Can’t very well let the lady down at this stage, can we?
When, sitting over our soup that evening, I related to him my memory of these last words of his, I rather expected him to laugh. Instead, he said solemnly:
‘I felt so sorry for you, my boy. So terribly sorry.’ Then perhaps sensing he had misjudged my mood, he gave a short laugh and said lightly: ‘I remember waiting at the harbor with you. I kept saying: ‘‘Look here, we’re going to have a lot of fun on that ship, aren’t we? We’re going to have a jolly good time.’’ And you just kept saying: ‘‘Yes, sir. Yes, sir. Yes, sir.’’’


註釈:

‘You may well be right, my boy,’ he said eventually.
「may well be/do」には2つの使い方があります。1つは「多分・・・だろう」。もう1つは「・・・するのももっともだ」です。「多分・・・だろう」が「本来」の意味で、「多分・・・だろう」⇒「・・・するのももっともだ」と意味が拡大したものと思います。ここでは「You may be right(あなたは正しいかもしれない)」に「well」が加えられて「多分あなたは正しいだろう」の意。「eventually」は「結局は、ついに、ゆくゆくは、いつかわ、やがて」。

‘I sincerely hope you are.

But just in case, why don’t you come with me anyway?
「just in case」はここでは「万一の場合に備えて」。

Then once your parents are found, they can send for you.
「send for …」は「・・・を呼びに人を派遣する」。

Or who knows? Perhaps they’ll decide to come to England too. So what do you say?

Let’s you and me go to England tomorrow.
「Let’s you and me」と一見「重複」するような表現ですが、ここでは「us」が誰なのかをハッキリさせる効果があり、この場面では「Let’s」より心に伝わるものがあります

Then we can wait and see what happens.’
‘But you see, sir, excuse me. But you see, the detectives looking for my parents. They’re the very best detectives.’
I am not sure what exactly the colonel said to this. Perhaps he just went on nodding.

In any case, the next moment, he leaned in even closer to me and placed a hand on my shoulder.
「in any case」は「ともかく」。「lean in」はここでは「体を寄せる」。

‘Look here. I realize how it must feel. Entire world’s collapsed about your ears.
「Look here」は「相手の注意を引く言葉(おい、ねえ)」。

But you’ve got to be brave.
「しかし、あなたは勇気を出さなくてはならない」。

Besides, your aunt in England. She’s expecting you, don’t you see?

Can’t very well let the lady down at this stage, can we?
「can’t very well let the lady down」は「can’t let the lady down(あなたの叔母さんをがっかりさせることはできない)」を「very well」で「和らげて」います。「あなたの叔母さんをがっかりさせることは適切ではない」。

When, sitting over our soup that evening, I related to him my memory of these last words of his, I rather expected him to laugh.
「over our soup」は「スープを食べながら」。「relate」はここでは「を話す」。

Instead, he said solemnly:
「solemnly」は「厳粛に、まじめくさって」。

‘I felt so sorry for you, my boy. So terribly sorry.’ Then perhaps sensing he had misjudged my mood, he gave a short laugh and said lightly: ‘I remember waiting at the harbor with you. I kept saying: ‘‘Look here, we’re going to have a lot of fun on that ship, aren’t we? We’re going to have a jolly good time.’’ And you just kept saying: ‘‘Yes, sir. Yes, sir. Yes, sir.’’’


『今日のイデイオム』

「may well be/do」
「多分・・・だろう」「・・・するのももっともだ」

「just in case」
「万一の場合に備えて」

「send for …」
「・・・を呼びに人を派遣する」

「in any case」
「ともかく」

「lean in」
「体を寄せる」

「can’t let do」
「・・・することは適切ではない」

日本人の9割が間違える英語表現(60)

(060)「昨夜は10時に寝た」
日本人の英語:I went to sleep at 10:00 last night.
ネイテイヴの英語:I went to bed at 10:00 last night.

「I went to sleep」の文字通りの意は「私は眠りのところまで行った」。「I went to bed」は「私は眠るためのベッドのところまで行った」。

従い、前者は「私は眠入った」の意です。後者は「床に着いた」。

「昨夜は10時に寝た」は通例「10時に床に着いた」でしょう。

Kazuo Ishiguro: When We Were Orphans (22)

‘So then, Christopher. It’s all decided. This is Colonel Chamberlain. He’s most kindly agreed to see you safe to England.’
I remember at this point a hush descending over the room. In fact, my impression was that all the adults shrank back until they were lining the walls like spectators. Mr. Anderson too withdrew with a final encouraging smile. It was then that I first laid my eyes on Colonel Chamberlain. He came up to me slowly, bent down to look into my face, then held out his hand. I had a feeling I should stand up to shake it, but he had thrust it out so quickly, and I had felt so fixed to that chair, that I had grasped his hand still sitting. Then I remember him saying:
‘My poor lad. First your father. Now your mother. Must feel like the whole world’s collapsed around your ears. But we’ll go to England tomorrow, the two of us. Your aunt’s waiting for you there. So be brave. You’ll soon pick up the pieces again.’
For a moment I was quite unable to find my voice. When I finally did so, I said: ‘it’s awfully kind of you, sir. I’m very grateful for your offer, and I hope you don’t think me very rude,
. But if you don’t mind, sir, I think I oughtn’t go to England just now.’ Then, when the colonel did not respond immediately, I went on:
‘Because you see, sir, the detectives are working extremely hard to find my mother and father. And they’re the very best detectives in Shanghai. I think they’re bound to find them very soon.’
The colonel was nodding. ‘I’m sure the authorities are doing everything possible.’
‘So you see, sir, though I very much appreciate your kindness, I think my going to England, it won’t necessary after all.’
I remember a murmur passing around the room at this point. The colonel went on nodding, as though weighing things up carefully.


註釈:
‘So then, Christopher. It’s all decided. This is Colonel Chamberlain. He’s most kindly agreed to see you safe to England.’
「so then」は「相手の注意をひきつける」表現。ここでは「それでね」位のニュアンス。「see you safe to England」は「あなたをイギリスまで安全に送って行く」の意。

I remember at this point a hush descending over the room.
「hush」はここでは「黙った、静かな」。「descending over the room」は「その部屋を支配すること」「hush descending over the room」で「部屋を静かさが支配したこと」のニュアンス。

In fact, my impression was that all the adults shrank back until they were lining the walls like spectators.
「in fact」は「前言を補足」する句です(事実上は)。「shrank back」で「後ずさりした」。「they were lining the walls」は「彼らは壁にそって並んでいた」。「spectator」は「観客」。

Mr. Anderson too withdrew with a final encouraging smile.
「withdrew」はここでは「あとずさりした」。

It was then that I first laid my eyes on Colonel Chamberlain. He came up to me slowly, bent down to look into my face, then held out his hand. I had a feeling I should stand up to shake it, but he had thrust it out so quickly, and I had felt so fixed to that chair, that I had grasped his hand still sitting. Then I remember him saying:
‘My poor lad. First your father. Now your mother.

Must feel like the whole world’s collapsed around your ears.
「collapse」は「崩壊する」。

But we’ll go to England tomorrow, the two of us. Your aunt’s waiting for you there.

So be brave.
「だから勇気を出せ」。

You’ll soon pick up the pieces again.’
「pick up the pieces」の文字通りの意味は「破片をかき集める」ですが、ここでは「元のさやに収まる」の意。

For a moment I was quite unable to find my voice. When I finally did so, I said: ‘it’s awfully kind of you, sir. I’m very grateful for your offer, and I hope you don’t think me very rude,
. But if you don’t mind, sir, I think I oughtn’t go to England just now.’ Then, when the colonel did not respond immediately, I went on:
‘Because you see, sir, the detectives are working extremely hard to find my mother and father.

And they’re the very best detectives in Shanghai.
当時イギリスはアメリカ、フランスと共に上海に租界地(外国人居留地)を持っていました。

I think they’re bound to find them very soon.’
「be bound to do」で「きっと・・・するに違いない」。

The colonel was nodding. ‘I’m sure the authorities are doing everything possible.’
「the authorities」はここでは「官憲、当局」。

‘So you see, sir, though I very much appreciate your kindness, I think my going to England, it won’t necessary after all.’
I remember a murmur passing around the room at this point.

The colonel went on nodding, as though weighing things up carefully.
「weigh things up」は「物事を比較考慮する」。


『今日のイデイオム』

「so then」
「相手の注意をひきつける」表現。ここでは「それでね」位のニュアンス。

「in fact」
「前言を補足」する句です(事実上は)。

「pick up the pieces」
「元のさやに収まる」

「be bound to do」で
「きっと・・・するに違いない」

「weigh things up」
「物事を比較考慮する」

日本人の9割が間違える英語表現(59)

(059)「彼女はもう彼を愛していないのだと気づいた」
日本人の英語:She noticed she didn’t love him anymore.
ネイテイヴの英語:She realized she didn’t love him anymore.

「気づく」を和英辞書で調べると「notice」「realize」「find」「awake」「note」が挙げられていました。

「notice」を英英で引くと「to see or hear somebody/something」「become aware of somebody/something」と説明してあります。即ち「見たり」「聞いたり」場合によっては「嗅覚」「味覚」によって「気づく」場合に使われます。

「realize」を英英で引くと「to understand or become aware of a particular fact or situation」と説明してあります。ですから「実感する」「悟る」という日本語を対応させることが出来ます。

以上を踏まえると、上記の「日本人の英語:She noticed she didn’t love him anymore.」は「間違い」だとは決めつけられないと思います(何か「感覚的に気づいた」感じがしますが)。著者なら「She became aware of the fact that she didn’t love him anymore.」とします。

Kazuo Ishiguro: When We Were Orphans (21)

This was no lie. Even now, if I were for a moment to close my eyes, I could with ease transport myself back to that bright morning in Shanghai and the office of Mr. Harold Andersen, my father’s superior in the great company of Morganbrook and Byatt. I was sitting in a chair that smelt of polished leather and oak, the sort of chair normally found behind some impressive desk, but which, on this occasion, had been pulled out into the centre of the room. I could sense it was a chair reserved for only the most important of personages, but on this occasion, owing to the gravity of the circumstances, or perhaps as a sort of consolation, it had been given to me. I can remember that, no matter how I tried, I could not find a dignified way to sit in it; in particular, I could discover no posture which would enable me to keep both elbows at once upon its finely carved arms. Moreover, I had on that morning a brand new jacket made from some coarse grey material – where it had come from, I do not know – and I was most self-conscious about the ugly way I had been made to button it almost to my chin.
The room itself had tall grand ceilings, a large map on one wall, and behind Mr. Andersen’s desk, great windows through which the sun was beating and a breeze blowing, I should think there were ceiling fans moving above me, though I do not actually remember this. What I do remember is that I was sitting in that chair in the middle of the room, the centre of solemn concern and discussion. All around me, adults were conferring, most of them on their feet; sometimes a few would drift over to the windows, their voices lowering as they argued a point. I remember too being surprised by the way Mr. Andersen himself, a tall grey man with a large moustache, behaved towards me as though we were old friends – so much so that for a while I assumed we had known each other when I was younger and that I had forgotten him. Only much later did I ascertain that we could not possibly have met until this morning. In any case, he had assumed for himself the role of uncle, continually smiling at me, patting my shoulder, nudging me and winking. Once he offered me a cup of tea, saying: ‘Now, Christopher, this will cheer you up,’ and had bent right down to peer at me as I had taken it. After that came more murmuring and conferring around the room. Then Mr. Andersen appeared in front of me again and said:


註釈:
This was no lie. Even now, if I were for a moment to close my eyes, I could with ease transport myself back to that bright morning in Shanghai and the office of Mr. Harold Andersen, my father’s superior in the great company of Morganbrook and Byatt.
「for a moment」は「ちょっとの間」。「with ease」は「容易に、たやすく」。「my father’s superior」は「私の父の上役」。

I was sitting in a chair that smelt of polished leather and oak, the sort of chair normally found behind some impressive desk, but which, on this occasion, had been pulled out into the centre of the room.
「some」はここでは「a とほとんど同じ」意(ある、何かの)。「impressive」はここでは「荘厳な」。

I could sense it was a chair reserved for only the most important of personages, but on this occasion, owing to the gravity of the circumstances, or perhaps as a sort of consolation, it had been given to me.
「sense」は「を感じる」。「personage」は「名士、有力者、地位の高い人、重要人物」。「the gravity of the circumstances」は「状況の深刻さ」。「consolation」は「慰め」。

I can remember that, no matter how I tried, I could not find a dignified way to sit in it;
「dignified」は「威厳のある、堂々とした」。

in particular, I could discover no posture which would enable me to keep both elbows at once upon its finely carved arms.
「posture」は「姿勢」。「at once」はここでは「同時に」。「finely」はここでは「上品に」。

Moreover, I had on that morning a brand new jacket made from some coarse grey material – where it had come from, I do not know – and I was most self-conscious about the ugly way I had been made to button it almost to my chin.
「self-conscious about …」で「・・・を気にする」。

The room itself had tall grand ceilings, a large map on one wall, and behind Mr. Andersen’s desk, great windows through which the sun was beating and a breeze blowing, I should think there were ceiling fans moving above me, though I do not actually remember this.
「beat」はここでは「照りつける」。「I should think …」の「should」は「控え目・ためらい・丁寧の気持ち」を表します。「・・・であったように思いますが」。

What I do remember is that I was sitting in that chair in the middle of the room, the centre of solemn concern and discussion.
「solemn」はここでは「重大な」。

All around me, adults were conferring, most of them on their feet; sometimes a few would drift over to the windows, their voices lowering as they argued a point.
「drift」はここでは「あてもなくあちこち動く」。

I remember too being surprised by the way Mr. Andersen himself, a tall grey man with a large moustache, behaved towards me as though we were old friends – so much so that for a while I assumed we had known each other when I was younger and that I had forgotten him.
「so much so that」は「非常にそうなので・・・」。

Only much later did I ascertain that we could not possibly have met until this morning.
「ascertain」は「・・・であることを確かめる」。

In any case, he had assumed for himself the role of uncle, continually smiling at me, patting my shoulder, nudging me and winking.
「in any case」は「どんな事情にせよ、とにかく」。「assume」はここでは「を引き受ける」。「for himself」はここでは「独力で」。「nudge」は「をひじで軽くつつく」。

Once he offered me a cup of tea, saying: ‘Now, Christopher, this will cheer you up,’ and had bent right down to peer at me as I had taken it.

After that came more murmuring and conferring around the room.
「murmuring」は「ささやく声」。「conferring」は「話し合い」。

Then Mr. Andersen appeared in front of me again and said:


『今日のイデイオム』

「for a moment」
「ちょっとの間」

「with ease」
「容易に、たやすく」

「at once」
ここでは「同時に」

「self-conscious about …」
「・・・を気にする」

「I should think …」
「・・・である(あった)ように思いますが」

「so much so that」
「非常にそうなので・・・」

「in any case」
「どんな事情にせよ、とにかく」

「for oneself」
「独力で」


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