「社会人のための英語回路構築トレーニング自習帖」著者のブログ

Thank You for Visiting Me! 「英語赤ひげ先生」による「知っている英語」を「使える英語」にするための「理論」と「教材」を一挙に無料公開しています。

2018年05月

Kazuo Ishiguro: When We Were Orphans (179)

I took a few paces around the room, trying to work out the exact spot where the couch would have been. As I did so, I found I could conjure up only the haziest picture of what it had actually looked like – though I could recall quite vividly the feel of its silky fabric.
Then eventually I became conscious of the others in the room, and the fact that they were all watching me with gentle smiles. Morgan and the elderly Chinese man had been conferring quietly. Seeing me turn, Morgan took a step forward, cleared his throat and began the introductions.
He was obviously friendly with the family and reeled off the names without hesitation. As he did so, each of them gave a little bow and smile, touching hands together. Only the old lady at the end of the table, whom Morgan introduced with extra deference, went on gazing at me impassively. The family was called Lin – beyond this, I do not now remember any names – and it was Mr Lin himself, the elderly, bulky gentleman, who from this point took charge.
‘I trust, my good sir,’ he said in an English only slightly accented, ‘that it gives a warm feeling to return here again.’
‘Yes, it does.’ I gave a little laugh. ‘Yes. And it’s a little strange also.’
‘But that is natural,’ Mr Lin said. ‘Now please make yourself comfortable. Mr Morgan tells me you have already dined. But as you see, we have prepared food for you. We did not know if you cared for Chinese cuisine. So we borrowed the cook of our English neighbor.’
‘But perhaps Mr Banks isn’t hungry.’
This was said by one of the young men in suits. Then turning to me the latter continued: ‘My grandfather is rather old-fashioned type. He gets very offended if a guest doesn’t accept every piece of hospitality.’ The young man smiled broadly at the old man. ‘Please don’t let him bully you, Mr Banks.’


註釈:

I took a few paces around the room, trying to work out the exact spot where the couch would have been.
「pace」はここでは「1歩」。「work out」はここでは「をつかむ(認識する)」。

As I did so, I found I could conjure up only the haziest picture of what it had actually looked like – though I could recall quite vividly the feel of its silky fabric.
「As I did so」は「私が部屋の周りを数歩歩いた時に」の意。「conjure up」はここでは「思い起こす」。「hazy」はここでは「ぼんやりとした」。「fabric」は「布地」。

Then eventually I became conscious of the others in the room, and the fact that they were all watching me with gentle smiles.
「eventually」はここでは「やがて」。

Morgan and the elderly Chinese man had been conferring quietly.
「confer」はここでは「話し合う」。

Seeing me turn, Morgan took a step forward, cleared his throat and began the introductions.

He was obviously friendly with the family and reeled off the names without hesitation.
「obviously」は「明らかに」。「reel off」は「を立て板に水のように言う」。

As he did so, each of them gave a little bow and smile, touching hands together.

Only the old lady at the end of the table, whom Morgan introduced with extra deference, went on gazing at me impassively.
「deference」はここでは「尊敬、敬意」。「impassively」はここでは「じっとして」。

The family was called Lin – beyond this, I do not now remember any names – and it was Mr Lin himself, the elderly, bulky gentleman, who from this point took charge.
「bulky」は「図体の大きい」。「take charge」は「担当する」。

‘I trust, my good sir,’ he said in an English only slightly accented, ‘that it gives a warm feeling to return here again.’
「my good sir」は著者も初めて見ましたのでニュアンスはよく分かりません。「男性に対する呼びかけ」と理解して下さい。「an English」と「不定冠詞」がついているのは「色々な英語があるが、その1つ」という意識。

‘Yes, it does.’ I gave a little laugh. ‘Yes. And it’s a little strange also.’
「also」を文尾に置く例は余り見たことはありませんが「副詞」ですので文法的には問題ありません。

‘But that is natural,’ Mr Lin said. ‘Now please make yourself comfortable. Mr Morgan tells me you have already dined. But as you see, we have prepared food for you.

We did not know if you cared for Chinese cuisine. So we borrowed the cook of our English neighbor.’
「care for …」はここでは「・・・が好きである」。「cuisine」は「料理」。

‘But perhaps Mr Banks isn’t hungry.’
This was said by one of the young men in suits. Then turning to me the latter continued: ‘My grandfather is rather old-fashioned type.

He gets very offended if a guest doesn’t accept every piece of hospitality.’
「offend」は「の感情を害する」。

The young man smiled broadly at the old man. ‘Please don’t let him bully you, Mr Banks.’
「bully」は「をいじめる」。


『今日のイデイオム』

「work out」
「をつかむ(認識する)」

「conjure up」
「思い起こす」

「reel off」
「を立て板に水のように言う」

「take charge」
「担当する」

「care for …」
「・・・が好きである」

ショッピング(shopping)

「shopping」は「shop」という動詞に「ing」(・・・すること)をつけた動名詞です。

「shop」の動詞の意は米では「(買い物のため)(店)をあさる、見て回る」です。「買い物に行く」は「go shopping」ですが「買い物のために店をあさり、満足できるものがあれば購入する(buy, purchase)」ニュアンスがあります。「window shopping」はよい例です。

「shopping bag」「shopping basket」「shopping center(米ではshopping mall)」「shopping list」の「shopping」は皆「動名詞」ですので「買い物をする為の」の意になります。もし「現在分詞」なら「買い物をしているbag」の意ですから空想の世界のことになります。

ですから「コンビニにパンを買いに行く」というような場合は「buy」が選択されます。

イギリスの口語では「shop」には「〔警察に人〕を通報[密告]する」の意もあるようですが、アメリカのスラングで最近は「を売り込む(sell)」の意で使っているのと同じ使い方かもしれません。

Kazuo Ishiguro: When We Were Orphans (178)

I drifted forward, and probably remained standing there for some time, gazing up at the gallery, tracing with my eye the route our stairs had once taken. And as I did so, I found an old memory coming back to me, of a period in my childhood when I had made a habit of coming down the long curve of the stairs at huge speed and taking off two or three steps from the bottom – usually while flapping my arms – to land in the depths of a couch positioned just a little way away. My father, whenever he witnessed this, would laugh; but my mother and Mei Li disapproved. Indeed, my mother, who could never quite explain why this particular practice was wrong, would always threaten to have the couch removed if I persisted with the habit. Then once, when I was around eight, I attempted this feat for the first time in months to discover the couch could no longer take the impact of my increased weight. One end of the frame completely collapsed, and I tumbled on to the floor, utterly shocked. The next instant, though, I had remembered my mother was coming down the stairs behind me, and had braced myself for the most terrible dressing down. But my mother, looming over me. had burst out laughing. ‘Look at your face, Puffin!’ she had explained. ‘If you could only see your face!’
I had not been hurt at all, but when my mother continued to laugh – and perhaps because I was still afraid of a scolding – I had begun to make the most of a pain I could feel in my ankle. My mother had then stopped her laughing and had helped me up gently. I remember her then walking me slowly round and round the hall, an arm around my shoulder, saying: ‘There now, that’s better, isn’t it? We’ll just walk it off. There now, it’s nothing.’
I never was scolded over the incident and a few days later I came in to find the couch had been mended; but although I continued often to jump from the second or third step, I never again attempted a dive into the couch.


註釈:

I drifted forward, and probably remained standing there for some time, gazing up at the gallery, tracing with my eye the route our stairs had once taken.
「drift forward」は「前の方に漂流する」⇒「前の方にゆっくり動く」。「gaze」は「じっと見る」。「gallery」はここでは「回廊(長くて折れ曲がった廊下)」。

And as I did so, I found an old memory coming back to me, of a period in my childhood when I had made a habit of coming down the long curve of the stairs at huge speed and taking off two or three steps from the bottom – usually while flapping my arms – to land in the depths of a couch positioned just a little way away.
「of a period …」は「memory」につながります。「take off」は「離陸する」⇒ここでは人ですから「手すりから手を放してジャンプする」。「flap」はここでは「バタバタ動かす」。

My father, whenever he witnessed this, would laugh; but my mother and Mei Li disapproved.
「witness」は「を目撃する」。「disapprove」はここでは「を好ましくないと思う」。

Indeed, my mother, who could never quite explain why this particular practice was wrong, would always threaten to have the couch removed if I persisted with the habit.
「persist with …」で「を続ける」。

Then once, when I was around eight, I attempted this feat for the first time in months to discover the couch could no longer take the impact of my increased weight.
「feat」はここでは「妙技」。

One end of the frame completely collapsed, and I tumbled on to the floor, utterly shocked.
「collapse」は「崩壊する」。

The next instant, though, I had remembered my mother was coming down the stairs behind me, and had braced myself for the most terrible dressing down.
「brace oneself」は「身がまえる」。「dress down」で「しかりつける」。

But my mother, looming over me. had burst out laughing.
「loom over me」は「私にのしかかるようにせまる」。

‘Look at your face, Puffin!’ she had explained.

‘If you could only see your face!’
「もしあなたが自分の顔が見えさえすれば」

I had not been hurt at all, but when my mother continued to laugh – and perhaps because I was still afraid of a scolding – I had begun to make the most of a pain I could feel in my ankle.
「make the most of …」は「を最大限利用する」。

My mother had then stopped her laughing and had helped me up gently.

I remember her then walking me slowly round and round the hall, an arm around my shoulder, saying:
「walk」はここでは他動詞で「を歩かせる」。

‘There now, that’s better, isn’t it? We’ll just walk it off. There now, it’s nothing.’
「there now」「(人をなだめて)さあさあ,まあまあ,ほらほら」。「walk it off」は「痛さを歩いて取り除く」。

I never was scolded over the incident and a few days later I came in to find the couch had been mended; but although I continued often to jump from the second or third step, I never again attempted a dive into the couch.
「incident」は「出来事」。


『今日のイデイオム』

「take off」
「離陸する」⇒ここでは人ですから「手すりから手を放してジャンプする」

「persist with …」
「を続ける」

「brace oneself」
「身がまえる」

「dress down」
「しかりつける」

「loom over」
「のしかかるようにせまる」

「make the most of …」
「を最大限利用する」

「there now」
「(人をなだめて)さあさあ,まあまあ,ほらほら」

「walk off」
「を歩いて取り除く」

コンテナ(container)

「コンテナ」と聞くと我々は「列車に沢山つながったコンテナ」を思い浮かべると思います。著者は昔アメリカのテネシー州にあるチャタヌーガというところに住んだことがありますが、このコンテナが何十とつながって踏切で長時間待たされたことが何回もありました。ある意味で壮観です。

英語の「container」から来た言葉ですが英語的には「コンテイナー」の発音になります。ドラム缶や高圧ガス容器などの産業容器を製造する、JFEスチールグループの企業では社名を「ジェイエフイーコンテイナー」と「コンテイナー」を採用しています。

何故「コンテナ」になったのかを想像してみました。「container」のアクセントが「テイ」にあるので「コンテナ」に聞こえたのではないでしょうか。更に「コンテナ」の方が発音しやすいという事情もあったのでしょう。

この「container」は「containする物」という意味ですので「box」「can」「canteen(水筒)」「jar」「pitcher(水差し)」「vessel(コップ、水差し、はち、たる、バケツなど)」等「容器」「入れ物」は全て「container」です。「船」も「vessel」ですが人・物を中に入れて運びますので同じイメージです。

「contain」は動詞で「を含む」「・・・の収容能力がある」「(自分・感情など)を抑える」の意で使われます。

Kazuo Ishiguro: When We Were Orphans (177)

Morgan stared at me in astonishment. Then he shrugged and said: ‘I suppose you’re right. Well, let’s go in.’
He led the way further into the house. We were in the darkness for several steps, and then I heard voices talking in Mandarin, and saw light coming from a doorway hung with beaded threads. We passed through the beads, then a further set of drapes, into a large warm room lit with candles and lanterns.
What do I remember now of the rest of that evening? It has already grown a little hazy in my mind, but let me try and piece it together as clearly as I can. My first thought of entering that room was that we had disturbed some family celebration. I glimpsed a big table laden with food, and seated around it, eight or nine people. All were Chinese, the youngest – two men in their twenties – were dressed in Western suits, but the rest were in traditional dress. An old lady, seated at one end of the table, was being assisted in her eating by a servant. An elderly gentleman – surprisingly tall and broad for an oriental – whom I took to be the head of the household, had immediately risen upon our arrival, and now the other males in the company followed his example. But at this stage, my impression of these people remained vague, for very rapidly it was the room itself that had begun to command all my attention.
The ceiling was high and beamed. Beyond the diner, right at the back, was a kind of minstrel’s gallery, from the rail of which hung a brace of paper lanterns. It was this section of the room that had drawn my gaze, and I now continued to stare past the table towards it, hardly hearing my host’s words of welcome. For what was dawning upon me was that the entire rear half of the room in which I was now standing was in fact what used to be the entrance hall of our old Shanghai house.
Obviously some vast restructuring had taken place over the years. I could not, for instance work out at all how the areas through which Morgan and I had just entered related to our old hall. But the minstrels’ gallery at the back clearly corresponded to the balcony at the top of our grand curving staircase.


註釈:

Morgan stared at me in astonishment.
「stare」は「じっと見つめる」。「astonishment」は「驚き」。

Then he shrugged and said: ‘I suppose you’re right. Well, let’s go in.’
「shrug」は「肩をすぼめる」。

He led the way further into the house.
「lead the way」は「案内する、先導する」。

We were in the darkness for several steps, and then I heard voices talking in Mandarin, and saw light coming from a doorway hung with beaded threads.
「Mandarin」「北京官話 (中国の標準語)」。「hang … with …」はここでは「・・・に・・・を掛けて飾る」。「beaded」は「玉で飾った」。「thread」は「糸」。

We passed through the beads, then a further set of drapes, into a large warm room lit with candles and lanterns.
「bead」は「じゅず玉」。「further」はここでは「さらに遠い」⇒「その向こうの」。「drape」は「掛け布」。

What do I remember now of the rest of that evening?

It has already grown a little hazy in my mind, but let me try and piece it together as clearly as I can.
「hazy」はここでは「もやのかかった」。「piece」はここでは動詞で「をつなぎ合わせる」。

My first thought of entering that room was that we had disturbed some family celebration.

I glimpsed a big table laden with food, and seated around it, eight or nine people.
「laden with …」で「・・・をたくさん持った」。

All were Chinese, the youngest – two men in their twenties – were dressed in Western suits, but the rest were in traditional dress. An old lady, seated at one end of the table, was being assisted in her eating by a servant.

An elderly gentleman – surprisingly tall and broad for an oriental – whom I took to be the head of the household, had immediately risen upon our arrival, and now the other males in the company followed his example.
「broad」はここでは「肩幅の広い」。「household」は「家族」。

But at this stage, my impression of these people remained vague, for very rapidly it was the room itself that had begun to command all my attention.
「command」はここでは「を集める」。

The ceiling was high and beamed.
「beamed」はここでは「梁が見えるように天井が張られた」。

Beyond the diner, right at the back, was a kind of minstrel’s gallery, from the rail of which hung a brace of paper lanterns.
「diner」は「小食堂」。「minstrel」は「吟遊詩人」。「a brace of …」は「1組の・・・」。

It was this section of the room that had drawn my gaze, and I now continued to stare past the table towards it, hardly hearing my host’s words of welcome.
「gaze」は「注視」。

For what was dawning upon me was that the entire rear half of the room in which I was now standing was in fact what used to be the entrance hall of our old Shanghai house.
「dawn upon …」で「・・・に分かり始める」。

Obviously some vast restructuring had taken place over the years.
「obviously」は「明らかに」。

I could not, for instance work out at all how the areas through which Morgan and I had just entered related to our old hall.
「for instance」は「例えば」。「work out」はここでは「をつかむ(理解する)」。

But the minstrels’ gallery at the back clearly corresponded to the balcony at the top of our grand curving staircase.
「correspond to …」は「・・・に一致する」。


『今日のイデイオム』

「lead the way」
「案内する、先導する」

「hang … with …」
「・・・に・・・を掛けて飾る」

「laden with …」
「・・・をたくさん持った」

「a brace of …」
「1組の・・・」

「dawn upon …」
「・・・に分かり始める」

「for instance」
「例えば」

「work out」
「をつかむ(理解する)」

「correspond to …」
「・・・に一致する」
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