「社会人のための英語回路構築トレーニング自習帖」著者のブログ

Thank You for Visiting Me! 「英語赤ひげ先生」による「知っている英語」を「使える英語」にするための「理論」と「教材」を一挙に無料公開しています。

放蕩息子の帰郷

放蕩息子の帰郷(93)

THE LIVING PAINTING (5)

Looking at the people I live with, the handicapped men and women as well as their assistants, I see the immense desire for a father in whom fatherhood and motherhood are one. They all have suffered from the experience of rejection or abandonment; they all have been wounded as they grew up; they all wonder whether they are worthy of the unconditional love of God, and they all search for the peace where they can safely return and be touched by hands that bless them.
Rembrandt portrays the father as the man who has transcended the ways of his children. His own loneliness and anger may have been there, but they have been transformed by suffering and tears. His loneliness has become endless solitude, his anger boundless gratitude. This is who I have to become. I see it as clearly as I see the immense beauty of the father's emptiness and compassion. Can I let the younger and the elder son grow in me to the maturity of the compassionate father?
When, four years ago, I went to Saint Petersburg to see Rembrandt's The Return of the Prodigal Son, I had little idea how much I would have to live what I then saw. I stand with awe at the place where Rembrandt brought me. He led me from the kneeling, disheveled young son to the standing, bent-over old father, from the place of being blessed to the peace of blessing. As I look at my own aging hands, I know that they have been given to me to stretch out toward all who suffer, to rest upon the shoulders of all who come, and to offer the blessing that emerges from the immensity of God's love.


注釈:本シリーズは今回が最終回です。
Looking at the people I live with, the handicapped men and women as well as their assistants, I see the immense desire for a father in whom fatherhood and motherhood are one.
「immense」は「(普通では計り切れないほど)巨大な、広大な、多大の、計り知れない」。

They all have suffered from the experience of rejection or abandonment; they all have been wounded as they grew up; they all wonder whether they are worthy of the unconditional love of God, and they all search for the peace where they can safely return and be touched by hands that bless them.
「abandonment」は「放棄」。

Rembrandt portrays the father as the man who has transcended the ways of his children.
「transcend」は「(経験・理性など<の限界>を越える(go beyond)」。

His own loneliness and anger may have been there, but they have been transformed by suffering and tears.

His loneliness has become endless solitude, his anger boundless gratitude.
「solitude」は「孤独」。「gratitude」は「感謝」。

This is who I have to become. I see it as clearly as I see the immense beauty of the father's emptiness and compassion.
「compassion」は「思いやり」。

Can I let the younger and the elder son grow in me to the maturity of the compassionate father?
When, four years ago, I went to Saint Petersburg to see Rembrandt's The Return of the Prodigal Son, I had little idea how much I would have to live what I then saw.

I stand with awe at the place where Rembrandt brought me.
「awe」は「畏れ」。

He led me from the kneeling, disheveled young son to the standing, bent-over old father, from the place of being blessed to the peace of blessing.
「disheveled」はここでは「(服装が)だらしのない」。

As I look at my own aging hands, I know that they have been given to me to stretch out toward all who suffer, to rest upon the shoulders of all who come, and to offer the blessing that emerges from the immensity of God's love.
「emerge」は「出て来る」。

この本は著者にとって3回目でしたが、「注釈」を加えるという立場で読みましたので毎日執筆して3カ月かかりました。その分著者にも「新しい」発見もあり、充実した3カ月でした。

放蕩息子の帰郷(92)

THE LIVING PAINTING (4)

And still, after a long life as son, I know for sure that the true call is to become a father who only blesses in endless compassion, asking no questions, always giving and forgiving, never expecting anything in return. In a community, all this is often disturbingly concrete. I want to know what is happening. I want to be involved in the daily ups and downs of people's lives. I want to be remembered, invited, and informed. But the fact is that few recognize my desire and those who do are not sure how to respond to it. My people, whether handicapped or not, are not looking for another peer, another playmate, nor even for another brother. They seek a father who can bless and forgive without needing them in the way they need him. I see clearly the truth of my vocation to be a father; at the same time it seems to me almost impossible to follow it. I don't want to stay home while everyone goes out, whether driven by their many desires or their many angers. I feel these same impulses and want to run around like others do! But who is going to be home when they return - tired, exhausted, excited, disappointed, guilty, or ashamed? Who is going to convince them that, after all is said and done, there is a safe place to return to and receive an embrace? If it is not I, who is it going to be? The joy of fatherhood is vastly different from the pleasure of the wayward children. It is a joy beyond rejection and loneliness; yes, even beyond affirmation and community. It is the joy of a fatherhood that takes its name from the heavenly Father and partakes in his divine solitude.
It does not surprise me at all that few people claim fatherhood for themselves. The pains are too obvious, the joys too hidden. And still, by not claiming it I shirk my responsibility as a spiritually adult person. Yes, I even betray my vocation. Nothing less than that! But how can I choose what seems so contrary to all my needs? A voice says to me, "Don't be afraid. The Child will take you by the hand and lead you to fatherhood." I know that voice can be trusted. As always, the poor, the weak, the marginal, the rejected, the forgotten, the least . . . they not only need me to be their father, but also show me how to be a father for them. True fatherhood is sharing the poverty of God's non-demanding love. I am afraid to enter into that poverty, but those who have already entered it through their physical or mental disabilities will be my teachers.


注釈:
And still, after a long life as son, I know for sure that the true call is to become a father who only blesses in endless compassion, asking no questions, always giving and forgiving, never expecting anything in return.
「compassion」の語源は『「com(共に)」+「passion(苦しむこと)⇒激情」』で「思いやり」の意。「the passion」は「キリスト教徒の受難」。「the Passion」は「キリストの受難」。『パッション』という映画がありましたが、原題はThe Passion of the Christ 。「in return」は「お返しに、返礼として」。

In a community, all this is often disturbingly concrete.
「community」はここでは「(ある共通の目的を持って共に生活をする)共同体」。「disturbingly」は「心をかき乱すほど」。「concrete」はここでは「実際の、現実の(definite, real)」。

I want to know what is happening. I want to be involved in the daily ups and downs of people's lives.
「ups and downs」はここでは「起伏」。

I want to be remembered, invited, and informed. But the fact is that few recognize my desire and those who do are not sure how to respond to it. My people, whether handicapped or not, are not looking for another peer, another playmate, nor even for another brother. They seek a father who can bless and forgive without needing them in the way they need him.

I see clearly the truth of my vocation to be a father; at the same time it seems to me almost impossible to follow it.
「vocation」の語源は『「voc-(叫ぶ)」+「-ation(結果として生じたもの)⇒神からのこれこれしなさいというお呼び』で現在では「召命」「天職」「職業」の意で使われています。日本語の「職業」に一番近い語は「occupation」。

I don't want to stay home while everyone goes out, whether driven by their many desires or their many angers.

I feel these same impulses and want to run around like others do!
「impulse」は「衝動(urge, instinct, drive, compulsion, itch, whim, desire, fancy, notion)」。

But who is going to be home when they return - tired, exhausted, excited, disappointed, guilty, or ashamed? Who is going to convince them that, after all is said and done, there is a safe place to return to and receive an embrace? If it is not I, who is it going to be?
The joy of fatherhood is vastly different from the pleasure of the wayward children.
「wayward」は「awayward」の「頭音」が消失したもの。『「away(向こうへ)」+「-ward(「・・・の方向に」の意の形容詞・副詞を作ります⇒backward, eastward)』が語源で「difficult to control」の意になります。ここでは「わがままな」が最適だと思います。

It is a joy beyond rejection and loneliness; yes, even beyond affirmation and community.
「affirmation」はここでは「賛同、支持」。「community」はここでは「一致」が適当と考えます。「rejection」とか「loneliness」を越えたところには「joy」があるのは、ある意味で当たり前ですが、「賛同、支持」「一致」があるところでは勿論「この世のjoy」はありますが、それをも越えた「joy」である、ということを伝えたいのだと解釈しました。

It is the joy of a fatherhood that takes its name from the heavenly Father and partakes in his divine solitude.
この部分は「エフェソの信徒への手紙3:15」からの引用。「御父から、天と地にあるすべての家族がその名を与えられています」。「fatherhood」の「father」は「the heavenly Father」に由来する、ということです。「partake in …」はここでは「・・・を共有する」。「solitude」は「孤独」。

It does not surprise me at all that few people claim fatherhood for themselves. The pains are too obvious, the joys too hidden.

And still, by not claiming it I shirk my responsibility as a spiritually adult person.
「shirk」は「を回避する(evade, avoid)」。

Yes, I even betray my vocation.
これは「Yes, by not claiming it I even betray my vocation.」というつながりです。「betray」は「を裏切る(be disloyal to, be unfaithful to)」。

Nothing less than that!
「それ以外の何ものでもない」。

But how can I choose what seems so contrary to all my needs?

A voice says to me, "Don't be afraid. The Child will take you by the hand and lead you to fatherhood."
「the Child」は「御子イエス」のこと。

I know that voice can be trusted. As always, the poor, the weak, the marginal, the rejected, the forgotten, the least . . . they not only need me to be their father, but also show me how to be a father for them.

True fatherhood is sharing the poverty of God's non-demanding love.
「the poverty of God's non-demanding love」の文字通りの意味は「何ごとも要求しない神の愛の貧しさ」となりますが、これでは分かったような分からない意味になってしまいます。「清貧」とすれば少しはニュアンスが出るかも知れません。

I am afraid to enter into that poverty, but those who have already entered it through their physical or mental disabilities will be my teachers.
「those who have already entered it through their physical or mental disabilities」は「ラルシェ・コミュニテイで肉体的、精神的ハンデキャップを持ちながら生活している人々」を指しています。

放蕩息子の帰郷(91)

THE LIVING PAINTING (3)

While these discoveries have profoundly impacted on my life, the greatest gift from L'Arche is the challenge of becoming the Father. Being older in years than most members of the community and also being its pastor, it seems natural to think of myself as a father.
Because of my ordination, I already have the title. Now I have to live up to it.
Becoming the Father in a community of mentally handicapped people and their assistants is far more demanding than grappling with the struggles of the younger and the elder son. Rembrandt's father is a father who is emptied out by suffering. Through the many "deaths" he suffered, he became completely free to receive and to give. His outstretched hands are not begging, grasping, demanding, warning, judging, or condemning. They are hands that only bless, giving all and expecting nothing.
I am now faced with the hard and seemingly impossible task of letting go of the child in me. Paul says it clearly: "When I was a child, I used to talk like a child, and see things as a child does, and think like a child; but now that I have become an adult, I have finished with all childish ways." It is comfortable to be the wayward younger son or the angry elder son.
Our community is full of wayward and angry children, and being surrounded by peers gives a sense of solidarity. Yet the longer I am part of the community, the more that solidarity proves to be only a way station on the road to a much more lonely destination: the loneliness of the Father, the loneliness of God, the ultimate loneliness of compassion. The community does not need yet another younger or elder son, whether converted or not, but a father who lives with outstretched hands, always desiring to let them rest on the shoulders of his returning children. Yet everything in me resists that vocation. I keep clinging to the child in me. I do not want to be half blind; I want to see clearly what is going on around me. I do not want to wait until my children come home; I want to be with them where they are in a foreign country or on the farm with the servants. I do not want to remain silent about what happened; I am curious to hear the whole story and have countless questions to ask. I do not want to keep stretching my hands out when there are so few who are willing to be embraced, especially when fathers and father figures are considered by many the source of their problems.


注釈:
While these discoveries have profoundly impacted on my life, the greatest gift from L'Arche is the challenge of becoming the Father.
「profoundly」はここでは「大いに」。

Being older in years than most members of the community and also being its pastor, it seems natural to think of myself as a father.
「pastor」は「牧師(プロテスタント)、牧者、司祭(カトリック)」。

Because of my ordination, I already have the title. Now I have to live up to it.
「ordination」は「叙階(カトリック)」。叙階とはカトリック教会で、助祭・司祭・司教などの聖職位を授けること。「the title」はここでは「Father という肩書」。「live up to …」はここでは「・・・に従って生きる」。

Becoming the Father in a community of mentally handicapped people and their assistants is far more demanding than grappling with the struggles of the younger and the elder son.
「demanding」は「骨の折れる」。「grapple with …」で「・・・に取り組む」。「struggle」は「もがき、あがき(endeavor, striving, effort)」。

Rembrandt's father is a father who is emptied out by suffering.
「empty out」は「をすっかりからにする」。

Through the many "deaths" he suffered, he became completely free to receive and to give.

His outstretched hands are not begging, grasping, demanding, warning, judging, or condemning.
「condemn」は「非難する(censure, criticize)」。

They are hands that only bless, giving all and expecting nothing.

I am now faced with the hard and seemingly impossible task of letting go of the child in me.
「let go of …」は「・・・から手を離す」。

Paul says it clearly:
「Paul」は「パウロ」。
"When I was a child, I used to talk like a child, and see things as a child does, and think like a child; but now that I have become an adult, I have finished with all childish ways."
「コリントの信徒への手紙一13:11」「幼子だったとき、わたしは幼子のように話し、幼子のように思い、幼子のように考えていた。成人した今、幼子のことを捨てた」。

It is comfortable to be the wayward younger son or the angry elder son.
「wayward」は「気まぐれな」。

Our community is full of wayward and angry children, and being surrounded by peers gives a sense of solidarity.
「peer」はここでは「仲間、友だち」。「solidarity」は「団結」。

Yet the longer I am part of the community, the more that solidarity proves to be only a way station on the road to a much more lonely destination: the loneliness of the Father, the loneliness of God, the ultimate loneliness of compassion.
「way station」は「旅の経由地」。「ultimate」は「究極の」。「compassion」は「思いやり」。

The community does not need yet another younger or elder son, whether converted or not, but a father who lives with outstretched hands, always desiring to let them rest on the shoulders of his returning children.
「converted」は「悔いた、後悔した」。

Yet everything in me resists that vocation.
「vocation」は「神の召し、召命」。

I keep clinging to the child in me.
「cling to …」は「・・・にしがみつく」。

I do not want to be half blind; I want to see clearly what is going on around me. I do not want to wait until my children come home; I want to be with them where they are in a foreign country or on the farm with the servants. I do not want to remain silent about what happened; I am curious to hear the whole story and have countless questions to ask. I do not want to keep stretching my hands out when there are so few who are willing to be embraced, especially when fathers and father figures are considered by many the source of their problems.

放蕩息子の帰郷(90)

THE LIVING PAINTING (2)

I also have lived the elder son's story. I hadn't really seen how much the elder son belongs to Rembrandt's Prodigal Son until I went to Saint Petersburg and saw the whole picture. There I discovered the tension Rembrandt evokes. There is not only the light-filled reconciliation between' the father and the younger son, but also the dark, resentful distance of the elder son. There is repentance, but also anger. There is communion, but also alienation. There is the warm glow of healing, but also the coolness of the critical eye; there is the offer of mercy, but also the enormous resistance against receiving it. It didn't take long before I encountered the elder son in me.
Life in community does not keep the darkness away. To the contrary. It seems that the light that attracted me to L'Arche also made me conscious of the darkness in myself. Jealousy, anger, the feeling of being rejected or neglected, the sense of not truly belonging - all of these emerged in the context of a community striving for a life of forgiveness, reconciliation, and healing. Community life has opened me up to the real spiritual combat: the struggle to keep moving toward the light precisely when the darkness is so real.
As long as I lived by myself, it seemed rather easy to keep the elder son hidden from view. But the sharing of life with people who are not hiding their feelings soon confronted me with the elder son within. There is little romanticism to community life. There is the constant need to keep stepping out of the engulfing darkness onto the platform of the father's embrace.
Handicapped people have little to lose. Without guile they show me who they are. They openly express their love as well as their fear, their gentleness as well as their anguish, their generosity as well as their selfishness. By just simply being who they are, they break through my sophisticated defenses and demand that I be as open with them as they are with me. Their handicap unveils my own. Their anguish mirrors my own. Their vulnerabilities show me my own. By forcing me to confront the elder son in me, L'Arche opened the way to bring him home. The same handicapped people who welcomed me home and invited me to celebrate also confronted me with my not yet converted self and made me aware that the journey was far from ended.


注釈:
I also have lived the elder son's story. I hadn't really seen how much the elder son belongs to Rembrandt's Prodigal Son until I went to Saint Petersburg and saw the whole picture.

There I discovered the tension Rembrandt evokes.
「evoke」は「を引き起こす(produce)」。

There is not only the light-filled reconciliation between' the father and the younger son, but also the dark, resentful distance of the elder son.
「reconciliation」は「和解」。「resentful」は「憤った(aggrieved)」。

There is repentance, but also anger.
「repentance」は「後悔、悔恨、悔い改め」。

There is communion, but also alienation.
「communion」は「親交」。「alienation」は「疎外」。

There is the warm glow of healing, but also the coolness of the critical eye; there is the offer of mercy, but also the enormous resistance against receiving it.
「enormous」は「(計りしれないほど)大きな(huge, vast, immense, very big)」。

It didn't take long before I encountered the elder son in me.
Life in community does not keep the darkness away.
「keep away」は「を遠ざけておく」。

To the contrary.
「それと反対に」。

It seems that the light that attracted me to L'Arche also made me conscious of the darkness in myself. Jealousy, anger, the feeling of being rejected or neglected, the sense of not truly belonging - all of these emerged in the context of a community striving for a life of forgiveness, reconciliation, and healing. Community life has opened me up to the real spiritual combat: the struggle to keep moving toward the light precisely when the darkness is so real.
As long as I lived by myself, it seemed rather easy to keep the elder son hidden from view.

But the sharing of life with people who are not hiding their feelings soon confronted me with the elder son within.
「confront … with …」は「・・・を・・・に直面させる」。

There is little romanticism to community life.
「romanticism」は「空想的雰囲気」。

There is the constant need to keep stepping out of the engulfing darkness onto the platform of the father's embrace.
「engulfing」は「飲み込む(現在分詞)」。

Handicapped people have little to lose.

Without guile they show me who they are.
「guile」は「策略、たくらみ(cunning)」。

They openly express their love as well as their fear, their gentleness as well as their anguish, their generosity as well as their selfishness.
「anguish」は「苦痛(agony, pain, torment, torture, suffering, distress, angst, misery)」。「generosity」は「寛大、寛容」。「selfishness」は「わがまま」。

By just simply being who they are, they break through my sophisticated defenses and demand that I be as open with them as they are with me.
「sophisticated」はここでは「非常に複雑な」。

Their handicap unveils my own.
「unveil」は「・・・のベールを取る(reveal, present, disclose)」。

Their anguish mirrors my own.

Their vulnerabilities show me my own.
「vulnerability」は「もろさ」。

By forcing me to confront the elder son in me, L'Arche opened the way to bring him home.
「confront」は「と向かい合う」。

The same handicapped people who welcomed me home and invited me to celebrate also confronted me with my not yet converted self and made me aware that the journey was far from ended.

放蕩息子の帰郷(89)

EPILOGUE:
THE LIVING PAINTING (1)


When I saw the Rembrandt poster for the first time in the fall of 1983, all my attention was drawn to the hands of the old father pressing his returning boy to his chest. I saw forgiveness, reconciliation, healing; I also saw safety, rest, being at home. I was so deeply touched by this image of the life-giving embrace of father and son because everything in me yearned to be received in the way the prodigal son was received. That encounter turned out to be the beginning of my own return.
The L'Arche community gradually became my home. Never in my life did I dream that men and women with a mental handicap would be the ones who would put their hands on me in a gesture of blessing and offer me a home. For a long time, I had sought safety and security among the wise and clever, hardly aware that the things of the Kingdom were revealed to "little children"; that God has chosen "those who by human standards are fools to shame the wise."
But when I experienced the warm, unpretentious reception of those who have nothing to boast about, and experienced a loving embrace from people who didn't ask any questions, I began to discover that a true spiritual homecoming means a return to the poor in spirit to whom the Kingdom of Heaven belongs. The embrace of the Father became very real to me in the embraces of the mentally poor.
Having first viewed the painting while visiting a community of mentally handicapped people allowed me to make a connection that is deeply rooted in the mystery of our salvation. It is the connection between the blessing given by God and the blessing given by the poor. In L'Arche I came to see that these blessings are truly one. The Dutch master not only brought me into touch with the deepest longings of my heart, but also led me to discover that those longings could be fulfilled in the community where I first met him.
It now has been more than six years since I first saw the Rembrandt poster at Trosly and five years since I decided to make L'Arche my home. As I reflect on these years, I realize that the people with a mental handicap and their assistants made me "live" Rembrandt's painting more completely than I could have anticipated. The warm welcomes I have received in many L'Arche houses and the many celebrations I have shared have allowed me to experience deeply the younger son's return. Welcome and celebration are, indeed, two of the main characteristics of the life "in the Ark." There are so many welcome signs, hugs and kisses, songs, skits, and festive meals that for an outsider L'Arche may appear a lifelong homecoming celebration.


注釈:
When I saw the Rembrandt poster for the first time in the fall of 1983, all my attention was drawn to the hands of the old father pressing his returning boy to his chest.

I saw forgiveness, reconciliation, healing; I also saw safety, rest, being at home.
「reconciliation」は精神の世界を論じるときには非常に重要な言葉で「和解」の意。

I was so deeply touched by this image of the life-giving embrace of father and son because everything in me yearned to be received in the way the prodigal son was received.
「embrace」は「抱擁、抱き合うこと(hug)」。「yearn」は「を欲しがる(long)」。

That encounter turned out to be the beginning of my own return.
The L'Arche community gradually became my home.
「L'Arche」はカナダのデイブレイクにある町。

Never in my life did I dream that men and women with a mental handicap would be the ones who would put their hands on me in a gesture of blessing and offer me a home.

For a long time, I had sought safety and security among the wise and clever, hardly aware that the things of the Kingdom were revealed to "little children"; that God has chosen "those who by human standards are fools to shame the wise."
「"little children"」はマタイによる福音書11:25を引用⇒『そのとき、イエスはこう言われた。「天地の主である父よ、あなたをほめたたえます。これらのことを知恵ある者や賢い者には隠して、幼子のような者にお示しになりました。』。「"those who by human standards are fools to shame the wise."」は「コリントの信徒への手紙一1:27」を引用⇒「ところが、神は知恵ある者に恥をかかせるため、世の無学な者を選び、(力ある者に恥をかかせるため、世の無力な者を選ばれました)」。

But when I experienced the warm, unpretentious reception of those who have nothing to boast about, and experienced a loving embrace from people who didn't ask any questions, I began to discover that a true spiritual homecoming means a return to the poor in spirit to whom the Kingdom of Heaven belongs.
「unpretentious」は「見栄を張らない」。「the poor in spirit」は日本では「心の貧しい者」と訳されていますが、直訳すれば「霊において貧しい者」です。ネットで調べてみると「霊において貧しい者」という表現は、新約聖書より少しだけ早い時期に書かれた「死海文書」によく出てくるものだそうです(死海文書は現在の「正統な」解釈では「怪文書」とされています)。当時のユダヤ周辺では一般的な言い回しの一つだそうです。もともと、旧約聖書の「心の砕かれた者」という言い方から派生(こちらも「死海文書」によく出てきます)。虐げられ、病に伏し、投獄されたりしている人々は神にすがる以外の道がなく、神の前にへりくだる人々です。そういう人々のことを「(霊において)貧しい人々」と言い、彼らこそ世の終わりに神の国に入る人々とされます。
⇒9月30日追記:この部分は新約聖書で最も有名な箇所の1つである「山頂の垂訓(The Sermon on the Mount)」に出てくるものですが、マタイとルカで表現が異なっています。マタイは「spiritually poor」、ルカは単に「poor」としています。後者の場合は文字通り「貧乏な」の意味ですが「人から奪わない」ことが含意されています。だから「幸せ」なのです。

The embrace of the Father became very real to me in the embraces of the mentally poor.
Having first viewed the painting while visiting a community of mentally handicapped people allowed me to make a connection that is deeply rooted in the mystery of our salvation. It is the connection between the blessing given by God and the blessing given by the poor. In L'Arche I came to see that these blessings are truly one.

The Dutch master not only brought me into touch with the deepest longings of my heart, but also led me to discover that those longings could be fulfilled in the community where I first met him.
「the Dutch master」は「オランダの巨匠」即ちレンブラントのことです。

It now has been more than six years since I first saw the Rembrandt poster at Trosly and five years since I decided to make L'Arche my home. As I reflect on these years, I realize that the people with a mental handicap and their assistants made me "live" Rembrandt's painting more completely than I could have anticipated. The warm welcomes I have received in many L'Arche houses and the many celebrations I have shared have allowed me to experience deeply the younger son's return.

Welcome and celebration are, indeed, two of the main characteristics of the life "in the Ark."
「the Ark」は「ノアの箱舟」で、ここでは「L'Arche」のこと。

There are so many welcome signs, hugs and kisses, songs, skits, and festive meals that for an outsider L'Arche may appear a lifelong homecoming celebration.
「skit」は寸劇⇒このような共同体では聖書に関する寸劇がよく行われます。「festive」は「お祭り気分の、陽気な(jolly, merry)」。


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